Political settlements and the politics of inclusion

Understanding political settlements and the politics of inclusion is at the heart of DLP’s research. By political settlements we mean ‘the formal and informal agreements between contending groups over the organisation of power in society and the rules of political engagement'.

Through a political settlements lens we can see where and how legitimate institutions that promote development are forged (or reforged). It shows us the importance of domestic political and social processes, and how these shape – and are shaped by – elites and leaderships. Political settlements are central to understanding how formal and informal rules operate in a society, at both the state and sub-state levels. Exploring these processes illuminates the internal and external relationships involved – among actors including politicians, government officials, civil society, the military, the private sector, and donors.

Political settlements and the politics of inclusion

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Research09/09/2015
Research24/09/2014
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Opinion by Suda Perera19th December 201619/12/2016

The challenge of realising Pacific democracies' development potential

How can Pacific democracies deliver for their citizens?

Opinion by Julien Barbara8th July 201608/07/2016

It's all about inclusion, but how?

Guest post for the World Bank

Opinion by Alina Rocha Menocal6th April 201606/04/2016

The road to transparency in resource-rich Myanmar

Myanmar's EITI process and its contribution to broader reform

Opinion by Taylor Brown1st April 201601/04/2016

The inclusiveness test: making change work

Guest post for openDemocracy

Opinion by Alina Rocha Menocal4th November 201504/11/2015

Developmental leadership: putting inclusiveness first

Inclusiveness should be the first step towards building more robust states.

Opinion by Seth D. Kaplan24th September 201524/09/2015

Two remarkable transitions: lessons from Oman and Somaliland

Political settlements and international power structures

Opinion by Sarah Phillips20th July 201520/07/2015

Indonesia and the political settlements trap

The challenges of 'resettling the settlement'

Opinion by Graham Teskey17th July 201517/07/2015

What do we do on Monday? Political settlements in theory and practice

The value of the political settlements framework

Opinion by Edward Laws15th July 201515/07/2015

Inclusive political settlements: who and what gets included, and how?

First of six posts on political settlements by researchers, policymakers and practitioners.

Opinion by Alina Rocha Menocal13th July 201513/07/2015

Citizens + engagement: moving beyond slogans

Guest post for Governance for Development

Opinion by Alina Rocha Menocal20th March 201520/03/2015

Shuffling the decks: quick fixes versus long-term stability

Guest post for Development Progress on 'post-conflict' DRC

Opinion by Suda Perera22nd January 201522/01/2015

Authoritarianism, democracy and development

What does the evidence say?

Opinion by Tim Kelsall27th November 201427/11/2014
Opinion by Heather Marquette10th November 201410/11/2014

Corruption: do we target the servant or the paymaster?

Guest post for The Guardian on UK aid watchdog report

Opinion by Heather Marquette5th November 201405/11/2014

The politics of redistribution: we need you

Which are the key country cases? Help us shape new research.

Opinion by David Hudson, Niheer Dasandi16th October 201416/10/2014
Opinion by Susy Ndaruhutse11th September 201411/09/2014

Forgotten South Sudan tangled in factionalism and failed politics

A toxic blend of complex historical identity politics and short-term elite politicking

Opinion by Jonathan Fisher4th September 201404/09/2014

Medellin - more than a miracle

From the most murderous city on earth to 'a new global standard for urban policy': the politics of change in the wake of crisis

Opinion by Cheryl Stonehouse4th March 201404/03/2014

What's in a name? Leadership as more than the 'big men' and 'big women' of history

Looking beyond 'The Leader' for a deeper understanding of how change happens

Opinion by Heather Lyne de Ver11th February 201411/02/2014

Somaliland's route to peace

What can we learn from Somaliland's approach to peacebuilding? 

Opinion by Sarah Phillips12th December 201312/12/2013
31st October 201631/10/2016
7th July 201607/07/2016
13th May 201613/05/2016
3rd December 201503/12/2015
28th September 201528/09/2015
3rd December 201403/12/2014
23rd October 201423/10/2014
24th September 201424/09/2014
30th May 201430/05/2014
16th November 201016/11/2010
Suda PereraFebruary 201505/02/2015
Claire McloughlinDecember 201402/12/2014

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

Find out more

News

New article: A typology of interaction between politicians and bureaucrats

Tuesday 14th March 2017

DLP Research Fellow Niheer Dasandi has co-authored a new article on how bureaucrats and politicians interact, and how this affects reform efforts. It appears in 'Public Administration and Development'.

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Power and systems, and their role in developmental change: Guest seminar with Duncan Green

Tuesday 21st February 2017

Seeing power and complex social systems clearly is the first step towards supporting positive developmental change, says Oxfam Strategic Director and DLP research partner Duncan Green. He discussed the themes of his latest book at a recent International Development Department guest seminar at the University of Birmingham.

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