Willingness to Report Corruption

When people view corruption as widespread, are they less willing to fight it? When people see the government's anti-corruption efforts as ineffective, are they prompted to take action themselves instead? 

Using data from Transparency International's Global Corruption Barometer, this study is examining anti-corruption activism across 71 countries. It is exploring the factors at individual and national level that affect people’s willingness to get involved in such activism. 

What are the implications of these factors for ‘demand-side’ anti-corruption initiatives? Such initiatives seek to help create the socio-political space for citizens to voice their demands for better control over corruption, and they are increasingly common.

 

Researchers: Caryn Peiffer and Linda Alvarez (Assistant Professor at California State University)

 

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New findings on education and developmental leadership in the Philippines

Thursday 15th September 2016

New research from DLP and the University of Glasgow explores the role of higher education in the emergence of leaders who promote development in the Philippines. See the policy brief, podcast and paper.

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Political settlements in Africa

Thursday 7th July 2016

Political settlements in Africa, the politics of inclusion and the role of international actors were the focus of the most recent BISA Africa Working Group workshop, convened by DLP Research Fellow Suda Perera at the University of Birmingham.

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