The politics of reform in Myanmar

This research project considers the politics of reform in Myanmar – specifically, the factors that drive and constrain economic reform. It is being carried out in partnership with the Mekong Business Initiative, a DFAT and Asian Development Bank programme promoting private sector development in Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. We will also be conducting parts of the research with Oxfam Myanmar. The research project aims to uncover lessons for external actors seeking to support reform in Myanmar and beyond.

The project will initially examine specific recent reforms in Myanmar, including telecoms reform and the reform of the investment law. We are also interested in looking more broadly at the use of public consultation processes – something that has emerged as an important and surprising feature of Myanmar’s reforms.

This project is closely related to the research on Politics, bureaucracy, and business

DLP researchers: Niheer Dasandi and David Hudson

Related blog post: Positive deviance and Myanmar's telecoms revolution

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

'How Change Happens': Birmingham seminar with Duncan Green

Monday 9th January 2017

What works in achieving progressive change? How do power and systems shape change, and how can you influence them? Join Oxfam's Duncan Green on Thursday 19 January to discuss the themes of his new book 'How Change Happens'. The presentation will be followed by a drinks reception and book signing.

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Islands of integrity: funding award for DLP corruption research

Friday 2nd December 2016

DLP research on how to effectively fight corruption has won funding from the British Academy's Sustainable Development Programme, part of the UK government's Global Challenges Research Fund.

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