The ANC, business and development in South Africa

While South Africa’s transition from apartheid to democracy is the go-to case study of an elite political settlement, the economic pact that accompanied it has been overlooked. Before the transition, the ANC had insisted that only nationalisation could undo the socio-economic legacies of apartheid. But this stance was pragmatically discarded in favour of pro-business and liberal market policies to stabilise the economy and attract much needed foreign investment. 

This study finds that not only did this result in a stable political transition, but also in political and economic transformation.  Once the democratic pact was in place, the economic pact involved the formation of many formal and informal coalitions that sought to undo the economic legacies of apartheid. 

 

Researcher: Jo Ansie van Wyk (University of South Africa)

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The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

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New findings on education and developmental leadership in the Philippines

Thursday 15th September 2016

New research from DLP and the University of Glasgow explores the role of higher education in the emergence of leaders who promote development in the Philippines. See the policy brief, podcast and paper.

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Political settlements in Africa

Thursday 7th July 2016

Political settlements in Africa, the politics of inclusion and the role of international actors were the focus of the most recent BISA Africa Working Group workshop, convened by DLP Research Fellow Suda Perera at the University of Birmingham.

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