Manoeuvres for a low carbon state in China and India

The challenge of building the state capacity needed to ensure climate change mitigation takes place has been overlooked in the focus on agreeing emissions reduction targets. Implementing mitigation strategies involves carefully balancing competing priorities and crafting strategies to bring disparate interest groups on board. This study compares how government agencies in China and India have carried out this balancing act in promoting energy efficiency. 

Both countries have tailored approaches to the specific context, particularly to differing institutional capabilities. China’s approach is more explicitly statist than India’s. However, both states use ‘bundling’ to align interests and to build support for emissions reduction – for example, bundling mitigation with existing priorities such as energy security or pollution control. And in both countries the ability to build and sustain coalitions is central to the effectiveness and sustainability of climate change policy.

 

Researchers: Tom Harrison and Genia Kostka

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The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

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