Incentivising developmental leadership

What motivates national political leaders to comply with term limits and to establish good governance and inclusive institutions? Is the prospect of attractive post-office career opportunities a factor? What are the implications for donor engagement with leaders?

Leaders’ reluctance to leave office is recognised as a major obstacle to development. This study will build on forthcoming work by Alexander Baturo, which finds that leaders’ motives to remain in office depend on a) the income-generating capacity of that office versus potential income after leaving it; and b) personal concerns over future immunity and status.

This systematic study will examine whether / how the personal career concerns of national political leaders influence their behaviour while in office and their later career trajectories. It will examine national leaders in all regions over the period 1950-2013.

The study will develop a typology of leaders based on the governance and developmental outcomes of their leadership, and will aim to identify determinants of ‘leader types’ from biographical data. It will also analyse their later careers in relation to leader types and biographical data.

 

Researchers: Slava Mikhaylov (University College London) and Alexander Baturo (Dublin City University)

 

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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