Ensuring integrity in public service

Integrity management is vital for a successful public service, yet the tension between values-based and compliance-based approaches to making public services ethical is problematic. Emphasis on values embeds integrity by, for instance, drafting codes of conduct and giving employees moral awareness training. A compliance approach, on the other hand, is about sticking to clear rules and procedures and setting up routes for independent investigation and appeal.

This research project, part of ANTICORRP (http://anticorrp.eu/), and funded largely by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Development, will examine whether careful institutional design is enough to create an ethical public service. Using semi-structured interviews of middle-ranking public officials, small-N surveys, desk-based reviews and mapping methodology, it will focus on two little-studied cases – Bolivia, one of the poorest countries in South America, and Papua New Guinea, characterised by high levels of political instability. Our researchers will try to identify the best balance between compliance and values in integrity management. They will also track the interplay between global drivers of ethical service delivery and national initiatives.

Researchers: Heather Marquette and Caryn Peiffer (DLP) & Paul Heywood (University of Nottingham)

Documents

Tags

Related items

Bringing Political Economy Analysis in from the cold

Once seen as a 'transformative' tool to change donor thinking, does much PEA now do little to help staff think and work politically?

Opinion by Jonathan Fisher 6th May 2014

Corruption: is the right message getting through?

Anti-corruption messages aim to recruit citizens to the fight - but what do they actually hear?

Opinion by Caryn Peiffer 12th August 2015

Anthropology and elites: 'Studying up', politically

The parallels between - and ethical dilemmas of - anthropology's focus on context and international development's ‘thinking and working politically’ concept. 

Opinion by Paul Robert Gilbert 10th March 2016

Corruption: unpacking the black box of political will

New thinking on the reasons why individuals engage in corruption - including the pragmatic calculation that, right or wrong, corruption may be the only solution to pressing difficulties. 

Opinion by Heather Marquette 12th January 2015

Masculinity and sexual violence in India

The brutal rape and murder in December 2012 of a 23-year-old student in a Delhi bus has been the catalyst for rapidly evolving activism against sexual violence in India.

Opinion by Martin Rew 16th September 2015

Higher education in the post-2015 agenda: proof that it matters

Taking stock of recent research evidence that shows how higher education can feed into political stability and civil engagement.

Opinion by Susy Ndaruhutse 11th September 2014

Being 'there': Reflections on fieldwork in the DRC

Fieldwork in fragile places - Part 1: The security dilemma. Staying safe while collecting the data that matters. 

Opinion by Suda Perera 5th November 2014

International donors - aiding or abetting?

The importance of acknowledging the dilemmas donors may face when giving aid to developmental states.

Opinion by Niheer Dasandi 10th September 2015

Different development: walk the talk

The argument for asset-based approaches to development programming and practice that value communities' capacity, skills and knowledge.

Opinion by Gillian Fletcher 14th April 2015

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

Find out more

News

Doing Development Differently workshop - Jakarta 2017

Thursday 30th March 2017

Putting the concept of Thinking and Working Politically into practice was at the heart of a workshop on 15-16 March attended by more than 200 delegates from the field of international development. Delegates from the government, civil service and local organisations of the host country, Indonesia, were joined by academics, including DLP researchers, and staff from donor organisations and NGOs.

Read more

DLP shares research at FCO Africa Study Day

Monday 27th March 2017

DLP findings on the Democratic Republic of Congo were among the topics discussed with with UK diplomats and civil servants at the FCO's Africa Study Day, held at Sandhurst on 21 March. This year's Foreign and Commonwealth Office event was organised by University of Birmingham's International Development Department, home to DLP.

Read more

Follow: @dlprog