Education and developmental leadership in the Philippines

What kinds of education have leaders from lower-income countries experienced, and how have these shaped the individuals and coalitions who have the power to facilitate development?

This question is at the heart of a case study examining educational experiences, institutions and networks in the Philippines, funded through DLP. It explores the roles of a range of educational factors, such as: pedagogy; the curriculum; institutional selection processes; school ethos; values and the hidden curriculum; international mobility for study; extracurricular activities; and student (dis)empowerment. It builds on findings from related research in Ghana.

The project uses historical analysis, interviews with leaders of key social and political movements, and network analysis to focus on the importance of particular institutions, coalitions and educational experiences to individuals. 

The study's findings nuance the perennial emphasis on human capital as an outcome of higher education, highlighting the importance of social capital - particularly of networks with people from diverse backgrounds.

Listen to Prof Schweisfurth discussing the findings in a FreshEd podcast.

Research team:

Professor Michele SchweisfurthProfessor Michele Schweisfurth (Team leader) 
michele.schweisfurth [at] glasgow.ac.uk
University of Glasgow - Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change
 


 

Professor Lynn Davies

 

Professor Lynn Davies, University of Birmingham; 
Dr Lorraine Pe Symaco, CRICE, University of Malaya;
Dr Chelsea Robles, Nagoya University; 
Dr Oscar Valiente, Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change, University of Glasgow

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

Find out more

News

New article: A typology of interaction between politicians and bureaucrats

Tuesday 14th March 2017

DLP Research Fellow Niheer Dasandi has co-authored a new article on how bureaucrats and politicians interact, and how this affects reform efforts. It appears in 'Public Administration and Development'.

Read more

Power and systems, and their role in developmental change: Guest seminar with Duncan Green

Tuesday 21st February 2017

Seeing power and complex social systems clearly is the first step towards supporting positive developmental change, says Oxfam Strategic Director and DLP research partner Duncan Green. He discussed the themes of his latest book at a recent International Development Department guest seminar at the University of Birmingham.

Read more

Follow: @dlprog