Developmental dysfunction in Yemen

This study asks why the leaders and elites of some countries are so ineffective in addressing serious threats to the viability of their states (and to their own positions of power) and the wellbeing of their citizens. Is failure primarily attributable to individual leaders – that is, to agency – or are leaders and elites constrained by structural factors beyond their control? How important are external actors? 

This study of Yemen examined the regime’s opaque internal politics and the neopatrimonial system it had entrenched. It explored the roles of the key players in Yemen’s formal and informal elites, focusing on the dynamics of President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s secretive inner circle.

 

Researcher: Sarah Phillips (University of Sydney)

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

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Why political settlements matter

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Join us on 5 Oct 2017 at ODI (10-11:30am) to discuss the research featured in a special issue of The Journal of International Development co-edited by Alina Rocha Menocal (DLP and ODI) and Jan Pospisil (Political Settlements Research Programme at the University of Edinburgh).

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