Developmental dysfunction in Yemen

This study asks why the leaders and elites of some countries are so ineffective in addressing serious threats to the viability of their states (and to their own positions of power) and the wellbeing of their citizens. Is failure primarily attributable to individual leaders – that is, to agency – or are leaders and elites constrained by structural factors beyond their control? How important are external actors? 

This study of Yemen examined the regime’s opaque internal politics and the neopatrimonial system it had entrenched. It explored the roles of the key players in Yemen’s formal and informal elites, focusing on the dynamics of President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s secretive inner circle.

 

Researcher: Sarah Phillips (University of Sydney)

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About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New role for Alina Rocha Menocal

Monday 31st October 2016

After many significant contributions to DLP's research, events and impact, Alina Rocha Menocal is now moving on to take up a USAID Senior Democracy Fellowship. Alina will also continue her role as a Research Fellow in ODI's Politics and Governance Programme, on a part-time basis, and we are delighted that she will retain close links with DLP as a Research Associate.

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2016 Adrian Leftwich Memorial Lecture

Thursday 27th October 2016

The University of Manchester's annual lecture in memory of DLP's founding Director of Research, Adrian Leftwich, will be given this year by Nic van de Walle, Professor of International Studies at Cornell University, on Wednesday, 16 November.

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