Service Delivery, Legitimacy, Stability and Social Cohesion: Annotated Bibliography

Few studies rigorously trace the impact of service delivery on legitimacy, stability, or social cohesion. However, the available evidence provides the following findings.

Service delivery and state legitimacy

There is an emerging consensus that the received wisdom that more and better services can automatically improve state legitimacy does not hold. Further, processes matter more than outcomes. Perceptions of equity, distributive justice or fairness in decision-making may matter for legitimacy more than expansions in access.

Rigorous cross-country evidence shows no straightforward link between perceptions of services being provided and perceptions of the state’s legitimacy. Starting points, specific to each context – including citizens’ expectations of state services, or their overall perceptions of the fairness of the state and its treatment of different groups – influence how and whether services are significant for state legitimacy.
 
There is mixed evidence for and against the view that non-state provision undermines state legitimacy.
 
Service delivery and stability
 
One strand of this literature has focused on the role of poor quality service delivery in generating or exacerbating grievances towards the state. Exclusion from service delivery is considered a significant, and often overlooked, source of grievance in conflict-affected communities. This literature highlights the priority that communities themselves place on basic services in their everyday lives and, therefore, the value of service delivery in normalising and stabilising life in post-conflict situations.
 
A fairly small but consistent body of literature has highlighted that service delivery can be among the core strategies that non-state actors hostile to the state use to control populations and ensure their own continued support and survival. 
 
Service delivery and social cohesion
 
The assumed positive contribution of equitable service delivery to social cohesion does not seem to have a strong basis in evidence. Studies on this topic tend to focus on equity and inclusion in the delivery of services, and how this affects wider inter-group relations. Others focus on how processes of consultation on service design implementation or monitoring change social dynamics. It is sometimes argued that building community-level institutions around services can help strengthen social cohesion. But there is only isolated evidence of this.

 

See more details about the related research project Service delivery and social stability in Lebanon and Jordan.

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New article on how unfair service provision affects state legitimacy

Thursday 26th July 2018

Claire Mcloughlin's new open-access article in the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding draws on the case of higher education in Sri Lanka. It explores how unfair service provision can undermine state legitimacy in divided societies.

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New studies on leadership for transformational change in Africa

Thursday 31st May 2018

A new series of studies asks what factors support or hinder leadership for transformational change in Africa. They are published in collaboration with the UONGOZI Institute.

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