Concept Paper 1 - Predatory leaderships, predatory rule and predatory states

Although the notion has been around for a long time the term 'predatory' leadership has only recently been used by researchers and policy makers, but often in loose, varied or inconsistent ways. The concept brief sets out to sharpen the concept by pinning down some of the defining characteristics of 'predatory' rule. This is important in order to help policy makers, researchers or students differentiate predatory rule from other forms of rule, such as authoritarian or 'patrimonial' rule, or the regimes of 'weak', 'failing' or 'failed' states.

In conceptual terms predatory rule can be regarded as the extreme opposite of 'developmental', 'accountable' or 'responsive' forms of rule. However, as with all other social forms, the real world manifestations of predatory rule seldom correspond in all forms and particulars to the concept that seeks to describe them. Moreover, predatory regimes are seldom completely predatory, but may be more or less predatory in practice, though it is usually still possible to recognise the presence of some of their defining characteristics.

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New article - To Boldly Know: Knowledge, Peacekeeping and Remote Data Gathering in Conflict-Affected States

Thursday 12th October 2017

In this article in the Journal of International Peacekeeping, DLP researcher Suda Perera critically evaluates crowdsourcing's uses and abuses, and warns against an over-reliance on remotely gathered conflict data.

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Why political settlements matter

Thursday 5th October 2017

Join us on 5 Oct 2017 at ODI (10-11:30am) to discuss the research featured in a special issue of The Journal of International Development co-edited by Alina Rocha Menocal (DLP and ODI) and Jan Pospisil (Political Settlements Research Programme at the University of Edinburgh).

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