Elite Attitudes Towards Cash Transfers and the Poor in Malawi

This paper presents findings from primary research in Malawi that examined elites' attitudes towards poverty and how to reduce it. It shows that their attitudes – about the risk of dependency among the poor and about direct redistribution being unfair, for example – affect the policies they are willing to support and implement.

The findings question the sustainability of Malawi's cash transfers beyond donor funding. They suggest there would be more support among Malawi's elites for other forms of social protection such as public works and strategies that help the poor become economically active.

The paper argues that the planning of cash transfer programmes needs to involve more consideration of the country-specific attitudes of elites. It is members of a country's elites who are often expected to implement – and in the long term, allocate domestic funding to – such programmes.

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New article: A typology of interaction between politicians and bureaucrats

Tuesday 14th March 2017

DLP Research Fellow Niheer Dasandi has co-authored a new article on how bureaucrats and politicians interact, and how this affects reform efforts. It appears in 'Public Administration and Development'.

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Power and systems, and their role in developmental change: Guest seminar with Duncan Green

Tuesday 21st February 2017

Seeing power and complex social systems clearly is the first step towards supporting positive developmental change, says Oxfam Strategic Director and DLP research partner Duncan Green. He discussed the themes of his latest book at a recent International Development Department guest seminar at the University of Birmingham.

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