#Feminism: digital technologies and feminist activism in Fiji

14th March 2017

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Tait Brimacombe

Tait Brimacombe

Tait is in the final stages of completing her PhD, which explores the intersection of communication for development and gender in the Pacific, with fieldwork conducted in Vanuatu, Fiji and the Cook Islands. She has also contributed to research for AusAID (now DFAT) and the Australian Civil Military Centre on communication for development in fragile states, and the role of communication in complex emergencies. Her current research interests include women’s leadership, coalitions and collective action in the Pacific. Tait is based at the Institute for Human Security and Social Change, La Trobe University.

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