DRCongo: where a decade of failed democracy has exposed the electoral fallacy

19th December 2016

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The views expressed in Opinions posts are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of DLP, the Australian Government or DLP's partner organisations.

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Suda Perera

Suda Perera

Suda is a DLP Research Fellow based at the University of Birmingham's International Development Department. Her doctoral thesis examined the role of Rwandan refugees in the conflict dynamics of the eastern Congo. Suda’s current research focuses on the role of non-state actors in developmental leadership. For example, she is examining how armed groups in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo can be transformed into legitimate political actors who provide wider representation for marginalised citizens. 

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