Niheer Dasandi

Niheer Dasandi

Niheer completed his PhD at University College London on the relationship between international and domestic inequalities and poverty. His current research focuses on the links between inequality and poverty, the politics of policy reform in developing countries, the political economy of aid, and political-bureaucratic interactions. Before starting his PhD, Niheer spent two years as a consultant for the United Nations Development Programme. Niheer is based at the University of Birmingham where he is Birmingham Fellow in Politics and Development, in the School of Government and Society.

 

Articles

Developmental leaders, 'dirty hands', and the dark side of collaboration

11th December 2013

Should donors support developmental leaders who gain or keep power through questionable means? 

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The politics of redistribution: we need you

16th October 2014

Share your thoughts on episodes of redistribution that have helped redress inequality, and help us shape new research into the politics behind them. 

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Politicians and administrators: conflict, collusion or collaboration?

23rd October 2014

How do relations between political and administrative leaders affect reform?

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International donors - aiding or abetting?

10th September 2015

In September 2012, lawyers representing an Ethiopian farmer announced that they planned to sue the UK government for its role in human rights violations in Ethiopia. The farmer, named in court papers as “Mr O”, alleged that the Ethiopian government’s “villagisation” programme had involved the forced resettlement of thousands of families including his own.

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The curious case of Indian autocracy and what it tells us about 'thinking and working politically'

25th June 2015

Today marks the fortieth anniversary of Indira Gandhi’s declaration of a national emergency in India, which led to an 18-month period of autocracy. Civil rights were suspended, political opponents and journalists were arrested without the right to trial, censorship was imposed, elections were cancelled, non-Congress state governments were dismissed, the constitution changed.

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How does politically informed programming shape development outcomes?

29th January 2016

Many well-intentioned development programmes founder in the face of resistance from entrenched elites who feel threatened by a potential loss of power and resources. Resources intended for the poor and disadvantaged benefit the rich and powerful. In response, development practitioners and academics have become keenly interested in the political factors that shape development outcomes over the past ten years.

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Positive deviance and Myanmar's telecoms revolution

3rd February 2016

In Myanmar, as recently as 2012, a mobile phone SIM card cost more than USD 1,500. Yet by June 2015 more than half of the country's population had a card and a handset to go with it.

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