Caryn Peiffer

Caryn Peiffer

Caryn holds a PhD in Political Science from Claremont Graduate University. Her dissertation examined the impact in Africa of externally-driven democratisation on developmental outcomes. She has written DLP papers on the politics of state-business relations, reform coalitions for growth, and on corruption. Caryn examined the determinants of bribe payments as part of the Global Experience of Corruption project (University of Strathclyde). She has carried out research for Transparency International, DFID, AFD, and SIDA, and has worked in India, Zambia and Botswana.

Articles

Beyond perceptions of corruption?

5th February 2015

Recently I found myself refereeing an intense debate about whether smiling at a public official could be considered bribery. 

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Is education a magic bullet for addressing corruption? Insights from Papua New Guinea

17th June 2015

This post for Devpolicy unpacks the findings of a new Development Policy Centre / DLP paper 

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Corruption: is the right message getting through?

12th August 2015

A couple of years ago, Cote d’Ivoire’s government erected striking black and orange billboards around Abidjan that carried messages like “It destroyed my region” and “It killed my son”

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Why are Africa's poor more likely than the rich to pay a bribe for public services?

19th January 2017

Research in Africa has consistently found that the poor are more likely than the better off to pay bribes to state officials for public services. This matters for all sorts of reasons, but from a state-building and developmental perspective, the crisis of trust that corruption can trigger can be devastating. When services are pushed just that bit further away by public-servants-turned-corrupt-gatekeepers, it is likely to colour the already jaundiced perceptions that hard-pressed communities may have of state institutions and of their legitimacy; and also, as Seligson puts it, of ‘the broader national governance frameworks in which they are located’.

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Do anticorruption messages work? Findings so far and what they could mean for Papua New Guinea

23rd March 2017

Anticorruption posters and billboards are common sights around the world. Most anticorruption programs now include an awareness-raising element. The hope is that anticorruption messages – whether shared via posters, radio or TV, for example – will inspire citizens to refuse to pay bribes and to report any corruption they encounter.

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