Background

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) was founded in 2006 by the late Dr Adrian Leftwich in close association with Steve Hogg, senior governance specialist at the Australian aid program. The aim was to produce a body of research to address an important knowledge gap about the role of leaders and coalitions in the politics of development. 

Between 2006-2013, DLP gathered significant evidence on the role and importance of leadership and coalitions in developmental outcomes in sectors ranging from education to climate change. Its findings have helped shape international thinking on the politics of development and have influenced more than AU$ 1 billion of aid programming.

Since the sad loss of Adrian Leftwich in April 2013, his colleagues have been working to preserve and build on his legacy. 

In 2013, DLP established its research hub at the University of Birmingham (UK), where DLP’s new Director of Research, Dr Heather Marquette, is Reader in Development Politics. The new three-year research grant from the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) marks a first step towards the consolidation of DLP as a global partnership. The DLP team is in the process of establishing partnerships with other leading academic institutions around the world.

 

About DLP

The Developmental Leadership Program (DLP) is an international research initiative that explores how leadership, power and political processes drive or block successful development.

DLP focuses on the crucial role of home-grown leaderships and coalitions in forging legitimate political settlements and institutions that promote developmental outcomes, such as sustainable growth, political stability and inclusive social development.

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News

New article - To Boldly Know: Knowledge, Peacekeeping and Remote Data Gathering in Conflict-Affected States

Thursday 12th October 2017

In this article in the Journal of International Peacekeeping, DLP researcher Suda Perera critically evaluates crowdsourcing's uses and abuses, and warns against an over-reliance on remotely gathered conflict data.

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Why political settlements matter

Thursday 5th October 2017

Join us on 5 Oct 2017 at ODI (10-11:30am) to discuss the research featured in a special issue of The Journal of International Development co-edited by Alina Rocha Menocal (DLP and ODI) and Jan Pospisil (Political Settlements Research Programme at the University of Edinburgh).

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